Only in recent years has there been a decent selection of wine available in Beijing. Most locals do not drink wine but the burgeoning population of Chinese with disposable income and a taste for western food and drink has encouraged a new spate of cheap Chinese wines (from 50RMB), as well as boosting imports of the better labels from abroad. Chinese wines do not have a great reputation, but with all the different types out there, you may just hit on a good thing with enough tries. Imported wines are easy to find at Walmart, Carrefour, Jenny Lou’s and specialized stores.

Montrose Food & Wine: Representing over 70 wineries with 700 wines from 16 countries, this outlet has three locations in the city. Brands include Woodbridge, Taittinger and Mondavi vintages among many others. Orders can be made online and delivery is free within the Fourth Ring Road. Open Mon-Fri 8:30am-5:30pm http://www.montrosechina.com.

Top Cellar: One of the most popular wine retailers in Beijing, these stores stock over 500 wines with an international selection at all price points. Top Cellar regularly hosts wine tasting events. There are currently four locations in the city. Orders can be made online with free delivery within the fourth ring road. Open 9am-11:30pm (varies by location) http://en.topcellar.com.cn.

“Baijjiu”, which literally means “white liquor” is often served at important business banquets and celebreation. Not for the weak, this clear white drink is 40-60% alcohol per volume. Chinese traditionally serve baijiu either warm or at room temperature in small cups the size of shot glasses. Often, this strong liquor accompanies a meal rather than on its own, although shots are not uncommon. Many brands of baijiu are available in Chinese grocery stores and liquor stores.

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