Friday 29th October 2010

Transparency International have released the results of their latest corruption survey and Somalia has been named as the most corrupt country in the world.

The Corruption Perception Index, which was compiled by Transparency International in association with the World Bank, World Economic Forum and the Economist Intelligence Unit, was released this week and it makes very interesting reading for expatriates. The survey ranked 178 countries on a corruption scale of 0 to 10; 0 being highly corrupt and 10 demonstrating very little corruption. According to this year’s results Denmark, New Zealand and Singapore are the least corrupt countries in the world with scores of 9.3 on the corruption index. Expats in Finland and Sweden can also breathe a sigh of relief with these countries both scoring 9.2.

Unfortunately it isn’t good news for everyone. The United Kingdom was awarded its lowest ever score on the corruption index and was placed at position 20, this being attributed to the occurrence of fraudulent expense claims by politicians.

Responding to the placement of his country at position 164 in the index, Venezuelan Ambassador to the UK and Ireland, Dr Samuel Moncada, claimed that the Corruption Perception Index was nothing more than "hot air and propaganda". Speaking to the BBC he said: "Rich countries play an integral part in the corruption of the poor countries when we talk about drug money, banks, the financial crisis.

"Private banks received millions of pounds of public money and nobody in the rich countries calls that corruption. If that happened in Venezuela we would have been called the most corrupt country in the world."

Top Ten Least Corrupt Countries

Country Corruption Index Score
Denmark 9.3
New Zealand 9.3
Singapore 9.3
Finland 9.2
Sweden 9.2
Canada 8.9
Netherlands 8.8
Australia 8.7
Switzerland 8.7
Norway 8.6

Top Ten Most Corrupt Countries

Country Corruption Index Score
Somalia 1.1
Myanmar 1.4
Iraq 1.5
Afghanistan 1.4
Uzbekistan 1.6
Turkmenistan 1.6
Sudan 1.6
Chad 1.7
Burundi 1.8
Equatorial Guinea 1.9

For the full results, see the Transparency International website.

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